Why You Need a Public Adjuster

A public adjuster is hired by the policyholder to negotiate with the insurance company. A public adjuster who has extensive negotiating experience negotiates on the policyholder’s behalf and submits the insurance claim to the insurance company’s adjuster. Public adjusters are normally independent contractors.

Public adjusters are normally licensed in the state in which they work and have the education and experience to represent the policyholder. They may be employed by an insurance company, and may also be independent contractors who represent their client.

All public adjusters are licensed in the state in which they work, and most states require that any public adjuster that they employ must also be licensed in the state.

When an insurance company’s adjuster submits a claim to the insurance company’s adjuster, the public adjuster submits the claim to the insurance company’s adjuster. This process may occur during or right after a claim settlement. After a claim has been settled, a public adjuster who has extensive negotiating experience is likely hired by the policyholder to negotiate with the insurance company’s adjuster and submit the insurance claim to the insurance company’s adjuster. This submittal of claims to insurance company’s adjuster and negotiation of claims usually occurs right after the claim settlement, as these are the steps that the insurance companies are likely to require.

Most state laws prohibit insurance companies from using public insurance adjusters unless they are a licensed public adjuster. However, a company may use a public adjuster if they are an independent contractor or if they are employeed by a third party insurer such as an insurer-customer. All insurance companies require a public adjuster to be an independent contractor or they cannot use their services. These rules apply to both a public adjuster and an insurance company’s adjuster.

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If an insurance company’s adjuster is employed by an insurer, the insurer cannot use the adjuster unless the adjuster is an independent contractor. The insurer may use a public adjuster to negotiate on the policyholder’s behalf and submit the claim to the insurance company’s adjuster. A policyholder is probably required to provide notice of their claim within the required time limit. A public adjuster is likely required to notify the insurance company of their claim within the required time limit. The insurance company’s adjuster may only submit a claim to the policyholder’s adjuster if the insurance company’s adjuster has met the minimum requirements.

There are several steps in the process: 1. Notification, 2. Investigation, 3. Appeal. Notification requires the public adjuster to notify the insurer of the claim. Investigation occurs if the claim has merit. Appellate occurs when the insurance company’s adjuster refuses to adjust the claim on the policyholder’s or his insurer’s property. Appeals takes place to the insurance commissioner’s decision and a decision is rendered within a specific time period.

There is generally a time period in the claim process after notification to the insurer of a claim. This time period depends on the state. This time period is usually no longer than 30 to 60 days after notification of the claim. The time period is used to determine whether the insurer and/or the public adjuster has enough time to investigate and/or examine the policyholder’s property and provide services. After this time period, if no decision has been rendered by the insurance company, a decision may be rendered by the insurance commissioner.

4. Appeal

The appeal process for a decision rendered by the insurance commissioner is a specific time period for filing a notice of appeal. This time period is also 30 to 60 days of a decision rendered by the insurance commissioner. The time period is used to determine whether the insurer and/or the public adjuster has enough time to investigate and/or examine the policyholder’s property and provide services. After this time period, if no decision has been rendered by the insurance company, a decision may be rendered by the court. If the commissioner’s decision has been rendered, the time period may be extended up to 120 days. If a decision has not been rendered, it may be denied by the insurance commissioner. The insurance company’s adjuster cannot request for a 60-day extension in the appeal process. After the 60-day extension, the insurance company’s adjuster may request for a new 60-day extension.

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